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Types of STIs

Types of STIs

Chlamydia is the most common STI in the UK. Most people who have chlamydia do not have any symptoms and so are unaware they have it. This infection can be fully treated with antibiotics. 

Full information is available on the NHS Choices website.

Gonorrhoea is a bacterial infection and is the second most common STI. This infection is also easily treated with antibiotics. 

Full information is available on the NHS Choices website.

Syphilis is a bacterial infection and has become more common in the UK over the last decade, especially in men who have sex with men (MSM). Untreated syphilis can in some cases lead to serious complications. Having syphilis or any other bacterial STI also increases the chance of you catching HIV. Syphilis can be treated, but it is important to treat it as soon as possible. 

Full information is available on the NHS Choices website.

Genital herpes is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). This infection causes painful blisters on the genitals and the surrounding areas. The symptoms of genital herpes can be controlled with antiviral medicines. 

Full information is available on the NHS Choices website.

Genital warts are a very common STI and consist of growths, bumps or skin changes on and around the genital or anal area. This infection is caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Often genital warts cause no serious health problems but they can be an indication of being at risk of other STIs. Treatments for genital warts range from a cream to cryotherapy (freezing) depending on how severe they are. 

Full information is available on the NHS Choices website.


Trichomoniasis is an STI caused by a tiny parasite called Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) passed on through sex.

Full information is available on the NHS Choices website.    
    

Human immunodeficiency virus, most commonly known as HIV, is a virus that can be transmitted by unprotected sex with someone who has HIV.It can also be passed on by sharing infected needles. HIV attacks the immune system and reduces the body’s ability to respond to infections. Although there is no cure for HIV, early diagnosis and treatment will enable most people to live a long and healthy life. 

Full information is available on the NHS Choices website. 

Hepatitis B is an infection of the liver caused by a virus that's spread through blood and body fluids.

Full information is available on the NHS Choices website (http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Hepatitis-B/Pages/Introduction.aspx)